Throwback Interview: Geoffrey Thorne (2007)

Throwback Interview: Geoffrey Thorne (2007)

Geoffrey Thorne is no stranger to the world of Star Trek fiction. He got his first professional taste by winning the second prize in the Strange New Worlds VI contest for his story “The Soft Room”. He has gone on to have his stories published in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager anniversary anthologies, as well as writing and producing an acclaimed online series, The Dark. Geoffrey Thorne’s first novel, Sword of Damocles, is the fourth novel in the Star Trek: Titan series and will be released in December. He recently took time out of his schedule to participate in The Ten.

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Throwback Interview: Keith R. A. DeCandido (2007)

Throwback Interview: Keith R. A. DeCandido (2007)

Keith R. A. DeCandido is a fan-favorite author of numerous novels for various franchises, including Star Trek, Resident Evil, and World of WarCraft, as well as an original novel, Dragon Precinct. As a freelance editor, he has worked on Star Trek and Doctor Who anthologies, as well as the editor of the Star Trek eBook series Corps of Engineers. DeCandido was kind enough to participate in The Ten

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Throwback Interview: Andy Mangels and Michael A. Martin (2006)

Throwback Interview: Andy Mangels and Michael A. Martin (2006)

Michael A. Martin and Andy Mangels are some of the most popular writers for the Star Trek novel range. Their books include The Sundered, Mission Gamma Book Three: Cathedral, and the Star Trek: Titan novels Taking Wing (a USA Today Bestseller book) and The Red King, among others. Their work extends outside the scope of Star Trek, including short stories, comics, and DVDs. They were kind enough to participate in The Ten.

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musicHEADsphere 1.6

musicHEADsphere 1.6

A civilization constructed purely from living ideas, the Seven-Day Hegemony had accomplished much in their limited time span. Were they extant in the physical realm, their territory would have spanned a quarter of the universe. Their greatness was owed as much to their form as their origins; being living ideas, they had no need for rest or food. Some did sleep, however, merely to experience it in their forms, and an entire subculture within the Seven-Day Hegemony arose based solely on the idea of “cooking” – as such could exist in a memetic realm- for the sake of art.

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