Trelby 2.2 Won’t Install on Linux? Try This Download

Trelby 2.2 Won’t Install on Linux? Try This Download

Trelby is a free screenwriting software available for Windows and Linux. Recently, when I installed GalliumOS on my Chromebook (a topic for another time), I sought out a variety of software to install; chief among them were apps for writing. When I discovered Trelby was a thing, I promptly downloaded it and ran into software dependency issues, the bane of any Linux install.

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[Tech] PlayStation Vue: “Authentication of your PlayStation Vue account failed”

[Tech] PlayStation Vue: “Authentication of your PlayStation Vue account failed”

For the past few months I have been using the new PlayStation Vue internet TV service. I was lucky enough to live in an area where they’re offering it early and thus far have been happy with the service. It’s helped me cut the cord again and have no regrets. It has turned the PS4 into the ultimate media box for the living room, and the fact that the service works on PS3 is a great bonus.

But recently I upgraded the hard drive on my PS4 to a new 1TB drive, and after signing in and re-installing all the games and apps, PlayStation Vue would not launch. It failed with an error “Authentication of your PlayStation Vue account failed (s1_2e4-3)”. Not terribly helpful, but after chatting with Sony support, they provided me with the following solution.

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The Wearables Tipping Point

The Wearables Tipping Point

A few months ago, I had purchased a Fitbit, which is all the rage in terms of fitness trackers. I wanted something to track steps and easily sync to my smartphone in an ongoing effort to improve my health. Being budget conscious, I didn’t want to spend very much, and the Fitbit cost $99. For me, that hit the sweet spot.

The gadget geek in me had looked at smartwatches such as the Pebble and Samsung Gear for a while. Each presented issues. Samsung’s smartwatch was strictly tied to its Galaxy phone brand, and wouldn’t work with other devices. Though at the time I was using a Galaxy Note 3, I know myself well enough that I tend to switch between devices depending on testing needs and personal preferences, and tying myself to such a narrow set of options with Samsung would be an unwise move (the mediocre reviews didn’t help, either). With the Pebble, I liked the simplicity and long battery life, but felt like it was to smartwatches what the old Palm III was to handhelds: quaint rough drafts of the platform.

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